Depression

The Center for Disease Control released in March 2010, that an estimated 1 in 10 adults in our country suffer from depression. Sadly, women are more likely to suffer from depression than men (An Estimated 1 in 10 U.S. Adults Report Depression. (March 2011). Retrieved February 16, 2012, from http://www.cdc.gov/Features/dsDepression/). Depression can be hard to notice in yourself, particularly if you do not have a history of depression. Many women may know that they are depressed, but are not quite sure what to do about it. Depression symptoms can range from mild to severe and typically get worse if left untreated. Numerous studies have shown that medication and therapy together are the most beneficial to those suffering from depression. Please keep in mind that depression, like all illnesses, may present itself with some symptoms but not others. Depression can vary greatly but the following are some of the most commonly experienced symptoms:

– Sadness, anxiety, or “empty” feelings
– Decreased energy, fatigue, being “slowed down”
– Loss of interest or pleasure in activities that were once enjoyed, including sex
– Insomnia, oversleeping, or waking much earlier than usual
– Loss of weight or appetite, or overeating and weight gain
– Feelings of hopelessness and pessimism
– Feelings of helplessness, guilt, and worthlessness
– Thoughts of death or suicide, or suicide attempts
– Difficulty concentrating, making decisions, or remembering
– Restlessness, irritability or excessive crying
– Chronic aches and pains or physical problems that do not respond to treatment

What Is Depression. Retrieved February 16, 2012, from http://www.allaboutdepression.com